Skip to main content

About your Search

20130228
20130228
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2
of requirements. if we change that, make a choice about what we are not going to do. host: chuck hagel -- what is your opinion? guest: i think he is clearly qualified. he has the background in defense. i would be foolish to say his confirmation process went well. he will have to do better than that in terms of building the relationships necessary in the house and the senate because credibility manages -- matters an enormous amount. he will be very dependent on the staff at the pentagon to implement whatever policy he wants. he will need their faith and confidence. he will have to work to earn that in the same thing in the house and the senate. secretary leon panetta and secretary robert gates, they had an enormous amount of credibility in the pentagon and in the congress. in tough times and tough decisions, that enabled them to be very effective. secretary chuck hagel will have to work at that hard it does not come automatically. host: what is your relationship with the chair of the armed services committee, buck mckeon? guest: it is outstanding. we have a long tradition of the chair and the r
generals and our acting secretary of defense, secretary hagel now concur with. so we're okay with defense, and most of all the military is okay with it. then we also cut domestic spending. here we cut $27 billion, cuts in the farm bill. it eliminates subsidies that we don't need to do anymore. the presiding officer is from an agricultural state. we love your cheese. we even from time to time cheer on the green bay packers, but -- from time to time. but at the same time -- so we know agriculture is important, but essentially we have a tax subsidy structure that goes back to the 1930's. a different economy, a dust bowl, people vacating homes in oklahoma and following the grapes of wrath trail to california. so we came up through the new deal a way of subsidizing farms, restoring the land and restoring people to their land. but a lot of those subsidies aren't needed anymore, and quite frankly a lot of it goes to agribusiness for crops we don't even plant. so working with the agriculture committee, the appropriations didn't just do this out of the blue. we come up with $27.5 billion. now, muc
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2